“A Christmas Carol” by Charles Dickens

carol

Despite “A Muppet Christmas Carol” being my favorite holiday movie, I have never actually read the book, until now.  The classic story is pretty familiar of course, thanks to the Muppets and other adaptations.

A few new things I noticed in the book:

  • In Christmas Past, when Scrooge is a boy left alone at school over the Christmas holiday (because of a strict father?  Because the next Christmas his sister Fan takes him home saying “father is much kinder now”), his only companions are his books.  He is (metaphorically) visited by some of his favorites, including Ali Baba and Robinson Crusoe.
  • There’s a passage in Christmas Present where the spirit expresses disgust with those who would deprive the poor “of their means of dining every seventh day”.  Huh?  Doing a bit of googling, it seems that there was a political tussle going on in England in 1843 when the book was published, where lawmakers were trying to close a loophole in the law that forbade bakers baking bread on the sabbath.  Instead, the bakers had been lending out their ovens for the use of the poor to cook their meals.  Ovens were not a commonplace item in every home, particularly not in the homes of the poor.  Dickens is making commentary on the cold-hearted self-righteousness of rich politicians and the like who are trying to get the poor to abide by their own conception of the law of the sabbath, even when that means they cannot eat a proper meal.
  • In Christmas Future, Tiny Tim’s death has happened very recently indeed.  In the movie versions, when Bob comes home from the churchyard and comments how nice and green the location looks, I always assumed that Tim was already dead and buried.  Apparently, the first part is correct but not the second.  A little while after Bob comes in and makes that comment, he goes upstairs to spend a little time and kiss the cheek of dead Tiny Tim, laid out on a bed. Eww.
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